Saturday, August 22, 2015

Welcome to Art 103B

Hi Everyone,


The class will be available through Blackboard on Monday 8/24/2015



I wanted to welcome you to Art 103B and give you a look at the calendar and content of the class.  There are no textbooks for this class everything is available online.  

(The syllabus is at the bottom of this email.)



You should watch this video first before you do anything else.
How to Take the Class cc

Here's a breakdown of the percentages in the class.


EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE:
Quiz #1 5%
Exam #1 10%
Quiz #2 5%
Exam #2 15%
Quiz #3 5%
Exam #3 25%
Quiz #4 5%
Test #4 Final Exam 30%
   
 
Participation (Combination of in class and Facebook
10%
TOTAL 100%
CALENDAR



Quiz #1 Due September 18th 5PM
(If you take the quiz on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Test #1
Opens September 21st 10AM
Due September 23rd 5PM You may not begin this exam later than 3PM
(If you take the test on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Quiz #2 Due October 9th 5PM
(If you take the quiz on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Quiz #3 Due November 20th 5PM
(If you take the quiz on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Test #2
Opens November 2nd 10AM
Due November 4th 5PM You may not begin this exam later than 3PM
(If you take the test on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Test #3
Opens November 23rd 10AM
Due November 25th 5PM You may not begin this exam later than 3PM
(If you take the test on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Quiz #4 Due December 4th 5PM
(If you take the quiz on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Quiz #5 Due December 11th 5PM
(If you take the quiz on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Final Exam


Opens December 14 10AM
Due December 16 5PM You may not begin this exam later than 3PM
(If you take the test on the last day and something goes wrong with Blackboard I will not fix the problem for you.)


Videos
How to Take the Class cc



Study Guide #1

Overview

Basic-Concepts

How to Take the Class cc

How to Find the Study Guides cc

How to Match the Study Guides to the Vids and Texts cc

Cantor Center 1 cc

Cantor Center 2 cc

Cantor Center 3 cc

Cantor Center 4 cc

Cantor Center 5 cc

Ancient Greek Pottery cc

Early Ancient Greek Orientalizing Pottery cc

Classic Greek Qualities Symmetry Order and Architecture cc

Classic Athens The Nike Temple and Propylon cc

Greek Classic Erechtheion Porch of the Maidens cc

Greek Classic Parthenon cc

Greek Classic Sculpture and Plato cc

Early Ancient Greek Sculpture Part1 cc

Classic Greek Sculpture to Late Hellenistic cc

Roman Sculpture cc

Roman Architecture The Pantheon cc

Roman Architecture The Colosseum cc

Roman Art Late The Arch of Titus cc

Roman Architecture Ara Pacis Augustae cc

Roman Art Late Constantine his Arch and Basilica cc

How to Write a Five Paragraph Essay Quickly for Exams (Art History and Art Appreciation)




Renaissance to Baroque Art
12th to 16th C Renaissance Art Intro to Florence cc

Pisa Complex cc

12th C Romanesque Architecture and Sculpture cc

13th to 14th C Perspective St Francis Cimabue and Giotto cc

14th C Transitions into Late Gothic to Proto Renaissance Art cc

15th C Brunelleschi and Florence Cathedral cc

15th C Linear Perspective Masaccio and Mantegna cc

15th C Mantegna and the Camera Picta cc

Cantor Center 6 cc

Cantor Center 7 cc

15th C Early Northern Renaissance Limbourg Bros Van Eyck Metsys cc

15th C Ghiberti and the Gates of Paradise of Florence Cathedral cc

15th C Donatello David and the Feast of Herod cc

16th C Michelozzo Palazzo Medic Riccardi and Alberti Palazzo Rucellai Architecture cc

16th C Printmaking The Reformation Durer Cranach and Holbein cc

16th C Netherlandish Renaissance Art of Bosch cc

16th C Printmaking The Reformation Durer Cranach and Holbein cc

16th C The Redesign of St Peters During the Renaissance by Bramante and Michelangelo cc

16th C Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel Ceiling cc

16th C Raphael and the School of Athens cc

16th C Leonardo cc

16th C Women and Art During the Renaissance cc

Cantor Center 8 cc

16th C Michelangelo and the Last Judgment cc

Last-Judgment- Scenes

16th C Michelangelo and the Birth of Mannerism in Architecture at San Lorenzo cc

16th C Mannerism in Architecture cc

17th C Baroque Art The Vatican cc

17th C Baroque Art The Carracci Farnese Ceiling Self Portrait and Flight to Egypt cc

17th C Baroque Art Caravaggio cc

Cantor Center 9 cc

17th C Baroque Art The Gentileschi cc

Video: Rembrandt

17th C Baroque Art Rubens cc

17th C Baroque Art Velasquez cc

17th C Baroque Art Vermeer cc

17th C Baroque Art Bernini David and St Theresa cc

17th C Baroque Art Versailles cc

17th C Baroque Art Chardin and Greuze cc

18th C French Baroque and Rococo Art cc





Late 18th C to Mid 20th

18th C William Hogarth cc

18th C History Painting and Neoclassicism cc

18th C Neoclassical Art cc

18th to 19th C Romanticism Part 1 cc

19th C French Academic and Romantic Painting and the substyle Orientalism cc
19th C Romanticism Part 2 Walpole Ruskin Turner Goya Gericault cc

Cantor Center  10 cc

Cantor Center 11 cc

Cantor Center 12 cc

19th C Linear Perspective cc

19th C Paris Baron Haussmann and Caillebotte cc

19th C Impressionism Degas and Color Theory cc

19th C Realism in France Daumier Courbet cc

19th C Realism in Part 1 Daumier Courbet cc

19th C Realism Part 2 Manet cc

19th C Impressionism Monet cc

19th C Impressionism Mary Cassatt cc

19th C Post Impressionism Cezanne cc

19th C Post Impressionism Seurat cc

19th Paul Gaugin cc

19th C Vincent cc

19th C Rodin cc

20th C Expressionism Klimt Munch Kirchner cc

20th C DADA cc

20th Century Architecture Modernism Bauhaus DeStijl and International Style cc

20th C Picasso cc

20th C American Painters 1900 to 1930 cc

20th Benton and Pollock cc

20th C Rothko cc

20th C Pop Art Rauschenberg Warhol Oldenburg Johns cc







Fall 2015 Academic Calendar (updated February 20, 2015; subject to change without notice)
Event
Date
Begin accepting online applications for Fall Semester
Monday, February 23
Registration begins for special populations

Monday, April 27
Registration begins for continuing students, based on Schedule for Registration; use WebAdvisor

Thursday, May 4
Registration begins for former students and new students who have satisfied the Orientation requirement; use WebAdvisor

Monday, May 18
Holiday: Memorial Day (Ohlone College closed)
Monday, May 25
Due date for 10th-12th grade applications

Monday, July 27
Due date for Kindergarten-9th grade applications

Monday, August 10
Registration begins for 10th-12th grade students with a completed application; use WebAdvisor

Monday, August 17
Last day that students are added into classes from the waitlist

Sunday, August 30**

Last day to add full-term class without add authorization code (prior to 5:00pm)
Sunday, August 30* **

Fall Semester instruction begins[1]

Monday, August 31
Registration begins for Kindergarten-9th grade students with a completed application; use WebAdvisor

Monday, August 31
Holiday: Labor Day (weekend and Monday classes do not meet; Ohlone College closed)
Saturday, September 5 - Monday, September 7
Last day to submit petition to audit full-term class
Friday, September 11
Last day to add full-term class with add authorization code
Sunday, September 13**

Last day to drop full-term class without a W grade
Sunday, September 13**

Last day to drop full-term class and be eligible for a refund[2]

Sunday, September 13**

Census
Monday, September 14
Last day to petition to complete class on a pass/no pass basis
Friday, September 25
Last day to apply for Fall 2015 graduation with degrees or certificates[3]

Friday, October 2
Begin accepting applications for Spring 2016 Semester
Monday, October 5
Holiday: Veterans Day (Ohlone College closed)
Wednesday, November 11
Last day to drop from full-term class with a W grade
Thursday, November 19
Holiday: Thanksgiving (weekday and weekend classes do not meet; Ohlone College closed)
Thursday, November 26 - Sunday, November 29
Last day of instruction before Final Exams
Friday, December 11
Final Exam Period - see complete Fall Final Exam Schedule

Saturday, December 12 - Friday, December 18
Last day of the semester
Friday, December 18
Grades available via WebAdvisor; grades are posted as they are received
Wednesday, December 23
Winter Break (Ohlone College closed)
Thursday, December 24, 2015 - Friday, January 1, 2016
Spring 2016 Semester instruction begins
Monday, January 25




Fall Academic Calendar Footnotes



Students are responsible for class prerequisites, academic calendar deadlines, services information, and registration procedures.


The dates above pertain to 16-week classes starting the week of August 31, 2015 and ending the week of December 18, 2015. Classes with different start or end dates may have different add, drop, or refund deadlines.


* Students cannot add full-term classes online via WebAdvisor after the last day to add without add authorization code. After that day, students can only add full-term classes by using an add authorization code provided by the instructor.


** Admissions and Records office hours do not extend to cover weekends and/or holidays. Access during non-office times is available online through WebAdvisor.


[1] Use the following percentages to calculate deadlines for classes that meet for more or less than the full term:


  • Last date to drop with a refund: 8% of class meeting times
  • Last date to add: 20% of class meeting times
  • Last date to drop a class without a W (Census Date): 20% of class meeting times
  • Last date to apply for pass/no pass: 30% of class meeting times
  • Last date to withdraw with a W: 75% of class meeting times


If the class meets for 10 meetings or less, the class must be dropped prior to start of class to be eligible for a refund.


[2] The non-resident tuition and enrollment fees differ from resident fees. The deadline to drop with a refund also differs. Please see the Fall 2015 Fees Chart for information concerning non-resident tuition refund deadlines.


[3] The Application for Fall 2015 Degree or Certificate (Associate in Arts degree, Associate in Science degree, or Certificate of Achievement) is available from and should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. Applications received after the deadline will be processed for the next term.


Schedule for Registration


Continuing students are assigned the earliest registration times and appointments based on having a declared academic program (major) and by the number of Ohlone units earned toward that program.


New and former students receive the next opportunity to register but do not receive specific appointments.



Prof. Kenney Mencher
Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd.
Fremont, California 94539

Phone: (510) 979-7916

KMencher@ohlone.edu

http://www.kenney-mencher.com/
http://kenney-mencher.blogspot.com/
http://www.etsy.com/shop/kmencher
http://www.youtube.com/user/kmencher
http://www.udemy.com/u/kenneymencher/


OHLONE COLLEGE Fremont-Newark Community College District
ART 103B Survey of World Art History: 14th Century through the Present
4 Units 4 Lec Hrs
Kenney Mencher MA  MFA Assistant Professor of Art and Art History
Ohlone College, Office: 4316
43600 Mission Blvd.,  Fremont, California 94539
Phone: (510) 979-7916 kmencher@ohlone.edu




For the ON-LINE or DISTANCE LEARNING class: The most important stuff:
  • You do not need to come to the live class but you are very welcome to attend.  I think it will help you if you can!
  • Late work is not allowed in this class.
  • Plagiarism or cheating is copying a phrase (three to four words in order) from the internet, another student, or a book.
  • If you are caught plagiarizing or cheating I will earn an immediate "F" for the entire course and it will be reported to the Dean of Students.
  • There are no make ups for missed quizzes, exams, or assignments.
  • Class participation will be handled by your participation on the discussion boards and the blog and even facebook!  Of course you can attend the live class too!

For the live class: The most important stuff:
  • Late work is not allowed in this class.
  • Plagiarism or cheating is copying a phrase (three to four words in order) from the internet, another student, or a book.
  • If you are caught plagiarizing or cheating I will earn an immediate "F" for the entire course and it will be reported to the Dean of Students.
  • There are no make ups for missed quizzes, exams, or assignments.
  • Class participation will be handled by your participation in live class, attendance, on the discussion boards and the blog and even facebook!
  1. Define and restate in tests, class discussion and through long and short essay questions, knowledge of vocabulary relevant to the study of art history. 
  2. Define and restate the major formal and iconographic qualities for art and artifacts throughout the world after 1300 CE. The civilizations, regions, and cultures studied are Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.
  3. Compare different cultures’ artifacts and art.
  4. Define and restate similarities and differences in physical form, symbolism, and historical, cultural and historical contexts, unique to different cultures in order to identify the contributions of historically underrepresented cultures or perspectives from other groups to the development of the societies and institutions in the United States of America and Europe.
  5. Analyze and synthesize primary texts and assess how these texts relate to the artifacts and art they are studying.
  6. Describe works of art and period styles with vocabulary used specifically for the study of art history.


The lab will be to attend events in the art gallery on campus and to attend the scheduled field trips to the Louie Meager Art Gallery in the Smith Center of Ohlone's campus and the Cantor Center for the Arts on Stanford's campus in Palo Alto.  Please see the on-line calendar for the dates and times.
Course Description: Art History, 103B, Renaissance (14th century) through the 20th century is required for all Art, Graphic Design and Interior Design majors for the A.A. degree and satisfies transfer requirements for the U.C. & CSU campuses. This course satisfies the General Education, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Cultural Diversity requirement for all A.A. degree students. Course material is a survey of visual arts from 1300-2000 CE. It includes the arts of Africa, Asia, Native America, Mexico, and Latin America during these periods.
CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION:
Class will be primarily interactive lectures based on the assigned readings and projected slides.  Occasionally we will be viewing video tapes.  Homework is primarily reading from the textbooks; However, from time to time you will be asked to go to the library and read an article or a text I have placed on reserve or to use the internet.   A big part of your grade will be based on class participation and attendance.
A tentative calendar/schedule will be provided with this greensheet; however, there will be times when the schedule will need to be adjusted.
EXAMINATIONS & QUIZZES:

  • Notes and textbooks may not be used during examinations.
  • Missed quizzes and exams will be calculated as zeros.
MAKE UP EXAMS AND GRADE IMPROVEMENT:
Make up exams are only available in one of two instances: to those students who have made provisions to take the exams in advance of the test date or if a student has a signed medical excuse.  In general a makeup exam will be different than the original exam and will take the same amount of time to complete as the original.  There is extra credit which will replace a score you have earned on a similar assignment..
TEXTS
All texts and videos are available through BLACKBOARD
OPTIONAL TEXTS
  • Art: A Brief History, 5/E

Marilyn Stokstad, University of Kansas
Michael Cothren, Swarthmore College
ISBN-10: 0205017029
ISBN-13:  9780205017027
passwords
username: ohloneuser
password: ohlone
Outside of Class Assignments, Required Reading, Writing, and Other:
Over an 17-week presentation of a course, three hours per week are required for each unit of credit. For each hour of lecture, two hours of independent work done outside of class are required. The students in this class will be doing the following outside of class:
  • Study
  • Answer Questions
  • Required Reading
  • Written Work (essays/composition/report/analysis/research)
  • Observation of, or participation in, an activity related to course content (e.g., play, museum, concert, debate, meeting, etc.)
EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE:
 
EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE:
Quiz #1 5%
Exam #1 10%
Quiz #2 5%
Exam #2 15%
Quiz #3 5%
Exam #3 25%
Quiz #4 5%
Test #4 Final Exam 30%
   
 
Participation (Combination of in class and Facebook
10%
TOTAL 100%
Earning an associate degree or certificate from Ohlone can increase your likelihood of getting hired for a new job, increase your earning potential as an employee, and decrease your chance of being unemployed. Ohlone has almost 200 associate degrees and certificates from which you can choose—ranging from Certificates of Accomplishment (7+ units) to an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science with 60+ units. See a counselor and go online to consider available degrees and certificates .
http://www.ohlone.edu/catalog/20112012/cat058-113-curriculumguides.pdf
All your work will be your own.
Student Learning Outcomes
The student will:
  • Define and restate in tests, class discussion and through long and short essay answers, knowledge of vocabulary relevant to the study of art history.
  • Define and restate the major formal and iconographic qualities for art and artifacts throughout the world after 1300 CE. The civilizations, regions, and cultures studied are Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.
  • Compare different cultures’ artifacts and art.
  • Define and restate similarities and differences in physical form, symbolism, and historical, cultural and historical contexts, unique to different cultures in order to identify the contributions of historically underrepresented cultures or perspectives from other groups to the development of the societies and institutions in the United States of America and Europe.
  • Analyze and synthesize primary texts and assess how these texts relate to the artifacts and art they are studying.
  • Describe works of art and period styles with vocabulary used specifically for the study of art history.
ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
All the work on your assignments must be in your own words.  You may not copy from the book, glossary, encyclopedia, the internet or another student.
If you plagiarize, cheat, or copy on any assignment you will receive an immediate "F" for the entire course.
DO NOT QUOTE THE GLOSSARY OR BOOK'S PASSAGES: USE YOUR OWN WORDS.
Academic dishonesty defrauds all those who depend upon the integrity of the College, its courses, and its degree and certificates.  Students are expected to follow the ethical standards required in Ohlone courses.  These Standards are defined in the Policy on Academic Dishonesty.  Violations of this policy include cheating and plagiarism.  (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans.)
7.8.4.1 Definitions of Academic Dishonesty  (for further information visit http://www.ohlone.cc.ca.us/org/board/policy/Chapter7Reg.htm#7.8.2)

A. Cheating
At Ohlone, cheating is the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Cheating at Ohlone includes but is not limited to the following:
1. Copying, in part or in whole, from another's test or other evaluation instrument or obtaining answers from another person during the test;
2. Submitting work previously presented in another course, if contrary to the rules of either course;
3. Using or consulting during an examination sources or materials not authorized by the instructor;
4. Altering or interfering with grading or grading instructions;
5. Sitting for an examination by a surrogate, or as a surrogate;
6. Any other act committed by a student in the course of his or her academic work which defrauds or misrepresents, including aiding or abetting in any of the actions defined above.
B. Plagiarism
At Ohlone, plagiarism is the act of representing the work of another as one's own (without giving appropriate credit) regardless of how that work was obtained and submitting it to fulfill academic requirements. Plagiarism at Ohlone includes but is not limited to
1. The act of incorporating the ideas, words, sentences, paragraphs, or parts thereof, or the specific substance of another's work, without giving appropriate credit, and representing the product as one's own work; and
2. Representing another's artistic/scholarly works such as musical compositions, computer programs, photographs, paintings, drawings, sculptures, or similar works as one's own.
STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT
The student has the right and shares the responsibility to exercise the freedom to learn. The student is expected to conduct himself/herself in accordance with standards of the college that are designed to perpetuate its educational purposes.  These procedures, along with applicable penalties for violation, are found in the Standards of Student Conduct and Discipline and Due Process Procedures. (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans.)