Thursday, February 13, 2014

Perspective in Renaissance Art: Art 103B What we are Covering Thursday 2/13/14

 
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  1. 3.3 Art Appreciation Perspective in the Italian Renaissance and Baroque

    See them all in order with additional reading materials here: https://www.udemy.com/u/kenneymencher/
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  2. Linear Perspective

    https://www.udemy.com/art-history-survey-1300-to-contempo... View all the videos in chronological order with study guides and ...
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  3. Linear Perspective in the work of Masaccio and Mantegna

    Ohlone College Art 103B Professor Kenney Mencher (Art History Early Renaissance to Contemporary) ...
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  4. Van Eyck, Masaccio, Shakespeare, Perspective and Memento Mori

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  5. Perspectives: Saint Francis, Cimabue and Giotto

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Linear Perspective


 
 
 
 


Gustave Caillebotte, Paris a Rainy Day, 1877
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 Giotto St. Francis Driving out the Demons of Arezzo Assisi
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 

 

Cimabue, 
Virgin & Child Enthroned,
from the Church of Santa Trinita, Florence
c 1280. Tempera and gold on wood, 12' 7"x7'4"
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Giotto di Bondone, 
Virgin & Child Enthroned, 
(Ognissanti Altar,) c 1310. 
Tempera and gold on wood, 
10'8"x6'8"
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

 
 
 
Masaccio, Trinity with Donors, c1428
Santa Maria Novella, Florence Perspectives:
linear 
idealism
neoplatonic
humanistic
theological




 
 
 
 
Masaccio, 
Trinity with Donors, c1428
Santa Maria Novella, Florence
Perspectives:
linear 
idealism
neoplatonic
humanistic
theological






 
 
images of the reconstructed 3D model




 
 
 

 
 
 


chiaroscuro

 

Masaccio. Tribute Money, and Expulsion, fresco c1427 
Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine Florence, Italy, Italian Renaissance

 
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Masaccio. Tribute Money, and Expulsion, fresco c1427 
Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine Florence, Italy, 
Italian Renaissance
Matthew 17 and 22

 

 
linear perspective
atmospheric perspective
aerial perspective
sfumato
chiaroscuro
neoplatonic
humanistic
theological
classical
St. Augustine,
City of Man/City of God
 
b. Nov. 13, 354, Tagaste, Numidia [now Souk Ahras, Algeria]
d. Aug. 28, 430, Hippo Regius [now Annaba, Algeria]
also called SAINT AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO, original Latin name AURELIUS AUGUSTINUS feast day August 28, bishop of Hippo from 396 to 430, one of the Latin Fathers of the Church, one of the Doctors of the Church, and perhaps the most significant Christian thinker after St. Paul. Augustine's adaptation of classical thought to Christian teaching created a theological system of great power and lasting influence. His numerous written works, the most important of which are Confessions and City of God, shaped the practice of biblical exegesis and helped lay the foundation for much of medieval and modern Christian thought.

 

Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ 1501
tempera on canvas
Italian Renaissance
foreshortened
foreshortening

 

Albrecht Durer, Alberti's Veil c 1527 woodcut 3"x8.5"



Albrecht Durer, Alberti's Veil c1500


Albrecht Durer, Alberti's Veil c1500

Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ 1501
tempera on canvas
Italian Renaissance
 
The Northern Renaissance
c 1300-1600 in Northern Europe
Holland is also known as The Netherlands
Delft, Amsterdam and The Hague are the major cities.

Belgium is also known as Flanders
Brussels and Bruges are the major cities. 
Flemalle is another city we will be talking about.
 


 
 
 
February
March
Perspectives:  The Every Day or "God is in the Details"
 
Paul, Herman and Jean Limbourg. 
(The Limbourg Brothers)
Le Tres Riches Heures du duc de Berry
8"x5"
1413 tempera on parchment 
French Renaissance
 

genre scene

 


 
 

Robert Campin
(the Master of Flemalle) 
Merode Altarpiece c. 1425
oil and tempera on wood, 
central panel approx. 25"x25" 
Flemish Renaissance

 
 

Campin, Robert (the Master of Flemalle) Merode Altarpiece c. 1425
oil and tempera on wood, central panel approx. 25"x25" Flemish Renaissance
submerged symbolism


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
Jan van Eyck Arnolfini Wedding 1434 
oil and tempera on oak 82x60cm
Irwin Panofsky
Craig Harbison
Jacques Paviot

In the early 1990s Jacques Paviot, a French naval historian found something that challenged previously accepted beliefs about the painting. While doing unrelated research, he stumbled across a reference to what appears to have been what was generally accepted to be happening in the painting: Arnolfini's wedding to Giovanna Cenami. But the document Paviot found placed the wedding in 1447, 13 years after the date on the double portrait and six years after van Eyck's death.

 

 
 
 


 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Petrus Christus. 
Saint Eloy (Eligius) in his Shop.1449
Oil on oak panel, 38"x33" (98 x 85 cm) 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Flemish, Renaissance

 
 
 
Quentin Massys 
also called Metsys 
The Moneylender and his Wife,
1514
Oil on panel, 71 x 68 cm 
Flemish Renaissance

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
MASACCIO 1401-1428
Trinity with Donors c1428 
Florence,S.Maria Novella 16' tall fresco
 
 

 

 

 
 

memento mori
From Shakespeare's HAMLET Act 5, Scene 1 (In Grave Yard)
HAMLET
What man dost thou dig it for?

 
CLOWN
For no man, sir.

 
HAMLET
What woman, then?

 
CLOWN
For none, neither.

 
HAMLET
Who is to be buried in't?

 
CLOWN
One that was a woman, sir; but, rest her soul, she's dead.
HAMLET
How absolute the knave is! we must speak by the
card, or equivocation will undo us. By the Lord,
Horatio, these three years I have taken a note of
it; the age is grown so picked that the toe of the
peasant comes so near the heel of the courtier, he
gaffs his kibe. How long hast thou been a
grave-maker?

 
CLOWN
Of all the days i' the year, I came to't that day
that our last king Hamlet overcame Fortinbras.

 
HAMLET
How long is that since?

 
CLOWN
Cannot you tell that? every fool can tell that: it
was the very day that young Hamlet was born; he that
is mad, and sent into England.

 
HAMLET
Ay, marry, why was he sent into England?

 
CLOWN
Why, because he was mad: he shall recover his wits
there; or, if he do not, it's no great matter there.

 
HAMLET
Why?

 
CLOWN
'Twill, a not be seen in him there; there the men
are as mad as he.

 
HAMLET
How came he mad?

 
CLOWN
Very strangely, they say.

 
HAMLET
How strangely?

 
CLOWN
Faith, e'en with losing his wits.

 
HAMLET
Upon what ground?

 
CLOWN
Why, here in Denmark: I have been sexton here, man
and boy, thirty years.

 
HAMLET
How long will a man lie i' the earth ere he rot?

 
CLOWN
I' faith, if he be not rotten before he die--as we
have many pocky corses now-a-days, that will scarce
hold the laying in--he will last you some eight year
or nine year: a tanner will last you nine year.

 
HAMLET
Why he more than another?

 
CLOWN
Why, sir, his hide is so tanned with his trade, that
he will keep out water a great while; and your water
is a sore decayer of your whoreson dead body.
Here's a skull now; this skull has lain in the earth
three and twenty years.

 
HAMLET
Whose was it?

 
CLOWN
A whoreson mad fellow's it was: whose do you think it was?

 
HAMLET
Nay, I know not.

 
CLOWN
A pestilence on him for a mad rogue! a' poured a
flagon of Rhenish on my head once. This same skull,
sir, was Yorick's skull, the king's jester.

 
HAMLET
This?

 
CLOWN
E'en that.

 
HAMLET
Let me see.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Takes the skull
 

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio:a fellow
of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy: he hath
borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how
abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rims at
it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know
not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your
gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment,
that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one
now, to mock your own grinning? quite chap-fallen?
Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let
her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must
come; make her laugh at that. Prithee, Horatio, tell
me one thing.

 
HORATIO
What's that, my lord?

 
HAMLET
Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this fashion i'
the earth?
HORATIO
E'en so.

 
HAMLET
And smelt so? pah!
Puts down the skull
HORATIO
E'en so, my lord.

 
HAMLET
To what base uses we may return, Horatio! Why may
not imagination trace the noble dust of Alexander,
till he find it stopping a bung-hole?
HORATIO
'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.

 
HAMLET
No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither with
modesty enough, and likelihood to lead it: as
thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried,
Alexander returneth into dust; the dust is earth; of
earth we make loam; and why of that loam, whereto he
was converted, might they not stop a beer-barrel?
Imperious Caesar, dead and turn'd to clay,
Might stop a hole to keep the wind away:
O, that that earth, which kept the world in awe,

Should patch a wall to expel the winter flaw!
MASACCIO 1401-1428
Trinity with Donors c1428 
Florence,S.Maria Novella 16' tall fresco
Italina Renaissance
Jan van Eyck
Arnolfini Wedding 1434
oil and tempera, 33x22.5" 
London National Gallery
Flemish Renaissance

 
 
 

 
Craig Harbison.  
"Jan van Eyck: The Play of Realism."  
(London: Reaktion Books,) 1995.
Jan van Eyck
Arnolfini Wedding 1434
oil and tempera, 33x22.5" 
London National Gallery
Flemish Renaissance

Jan van Eyck Arnolfini Wedding 1434 oil and tempera on oak 82x60cm
 



 
 
 



Jan van Eyck Arnolfini Wedding 1434 
oil and tempera on oak 82x60cm
 
In the early 1990s Jacques Paviot, a French naval historian found something that challenged previously accepted beliefs about the painting. While doing unrelated research, he stumbled across a reference to what appears to have been what was generally accepted to be happening in the painting: Arnolfini's wedding to Giovanna Cenami. But the document Paviot found placed the wedding in 1447, 13 years after the date on the double portrait and six years after van Eyck's death.