Saturday, September 3, 2011

Caption/Fiction Contest: Ends September 19

Write a caption (one to several sentences) or a short story (under 1000 words) about this painting and and the best entry will win the watercolor.
Moment 24x30 inches oil on canvas
Buy this painting for $600
watercolor on Rives BFK approximately  11"x8.5"

This is based on the The Thematic Apperception Test, or TAT, is a projective measure intended to evaluate a person's patterns of thought, attitudes, observational capacity, and emotional responses to ambiguous test materials. In the case of the TAT, the ambiguous materials consist of a set of cards that portray human figures in a variety of settings and situations. The subject is asked to tell the examiner a story about each card that includes the following elements: the event shown in the picture; what has led up to it; what the characters in the picture are feeling and thinking; and the outcome of the event. 
So watch out what you write or maybe someone will think you're nuts!

Enter in the comments section
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You may want to e-mail me with your contact info so I can send you your prize.  
kenney.mencher@gmail.com
Let me know if you want a catalog!


More contests on this blog and my website:
http://www.kenney-mencher.com/

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This came in by email:

But for a Moment, We Faked Perfection by Elisa Bandy

            For lack of a better phrase, it could have been the perfect moment.  Only 'could,' because the ability of 'would' was robbed of the both of them by their mutual sense of arrogance and self-centered depravity.  It was their similarities that prevented them from being compatible; they knew all too well of the flaws that people in “love” were to hide from the other, as those very flaws were their own.  There was no mystery to their chemistry, no intrigue, nothing to discover.  Neither of them could bring themselves to love the other—not entirely, in any case—because when it came down to it, they harboured too much hatred for themselves in the first place.
            In that moment, though, neither of them could exist without the other.  It was a paradox, in that they hated everything about each other, yet they were inseparable all the more.  They could be alone out there on the floor, surrounded by hundreds of other people clinging to their own senses of existence, but this moment was theirs.  That one moment was their last shrapnel of togetherness before they ripped themselves from the other—a necessary separation so that they could survive.  There is a strange sort of attachment formed in the fires of hatred, something more powerful than bonds formed based upon mutual respect.
            If only life was full of 'woulds' instead of 'coulds,' then maybe they would have been meant for each other.